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On Earth Day, we had the pleasure of chatting with a group of farmers, advocates, and stewards of small farms and Community Supported Agriculture (CSA). We were joined by Tess Romanski from the Fair Share CSA Coalition, Trixie Wessel and Jarret Nelson from Glynwood Farm, Kate Becker from Cat Tail Organics, and Evan Wiig from the Community Alliance with Family Farmers. The speakers discussed the importance of community for their agriculture endeavors. “It’s a symbiotic relationship between the farmer and the eater; local farms are local businesses,” explained Tess. Evan shared that CSAs give urban dwellers and non-farmers a chance to feel connected to the land. “If there is a drought, you will feel and see the impact of that drought with your CSA; it brings you more in tune to what’s happening in food sheds and builds that bridge between urban and rural,” discussed Evan. Supporting CSAs also gives farmers some financial stability, which is especially important in current climates.

CSAs and small farms are also good for the environment. “Diversity is foundational to any healthy living system,” explained Evan. He emphasized the importance of promoting polices that support CSAs and small farms, calling on all of us to contact our local representatives to enact these policies. 

“Food affects everyone. Being part of a CSA is also being part of agriculture, and therefore, your food system. This helps promote a better and more diverse food system,” stated Evan.

Interested in joining your local CSA but don’t know where to start? Check out the Fair Share CSA Coalition Farm Search for information.  

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