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National Statute

Slow Food USA’s National Statute is the core operating contract for all entities within the Slow Food USA network. It’s a document that organizational leaders can turn to for specific guidance about managing their chapter or working group. We update the National Statute every four years and present it to the Slow Food USA network for a vote. Those invited to vote on the National Statute included chapter leaders and members, national working group leaders, national office employees, the board of directors, and international and regional councilors.

For the National Statute, we assembled a task force of Slow Food USA community members across the country to examine the previous version and dream up valuable modifications for our organizational structure over half a dozen sessions across 6 months. We then presented our revisions to a wide spectrum of Slow Food leaders for revisions before hosting a feedback session at the 2022 Leader Summit on Jan. 21.

The document was ratified on Feb. 28, 2022.

NEW TERMS IN 2022 NATIONAL STATUTE

Moving forward, we will refer to governors as regional councilors, and we will refer to working groups of our programs and thematic groups as Community Action Teams

INTRODUCTION

Preamble

Preamble

Slow Food USA (SFUSA), as a National Association and integral element of Slow Food International (SFI), is a membership organization operating as a non-profit corporation. 

The purpose of the corporation is to nurture the Slow Food movement in the USA by cultivating nationwide programs and a network of local chapters, hosting educational events and advocacy campaigns, and building solidarity through partnerships. Together, we are dismantling oppressive food systems to achieve good, clean and fair food for all. 

This National Statute is the core operating contract for all entities within the Slow Food USA network. By ratifying this document, we declare that we will abide by this community agreement and hold each other accountable to it. Slow Food USA recognizes the following organizational entities: Chapters and Chapter Leaders, Community Action Teams, Regional Councilors, National Office, Executive Director, National Board of Directors, and National Congress; as well as the governing bodies included in the Slow Food International Statute. Our collective work must also align with key international documents, including the Guiding Principles, the International Statute, the Code of Use for Slow Food Logos, and the Slow Food Fundraising Guidelines.

Amendments
Between the National Congress events, amendments to this National Statute may be proposed and submitted by any of the organizational entities named in this Statute to the National Board of Directors (NBOD) for approval. The NBOD may approve these amendments, subject to ratification by the National Congress, per Article 7B, below.

Core vision

Core Vision

PURPOSE: Slow Food exists to nourish biodiversity, climate, and health through food. We build caring relationships to create freedom for all to live dignified and joyful lives.

VISION: We envision a world where everyone can enjoy food that is good for them, good for the people who grow it, and good for the planet. We rally a worldwide movement to achieve good, clean and fair food for all.

MISSION: Slow Food cultivates a global network of local communities to unite the joy of food with the pursuit of justice. We defend cultural and biological diversity, educate and mobilize people, and influence policies in public and private sectors.

TAGLINE: Good, clean and fair food for all.

  • Good: 
    • Delicious, healthy, and culturally appropriate food is a right for everyone.
    • Diversity of people, cultures, places, foods and tastes is key for resilient societies and ecosystems.
  • Clean: 
    • To mitigate climate change and biodiversity loss, food should be local, seasonal, and sustainably grown.
    • Food should be produced without causing harm to ecosystems or living species, in a non-polluted environment that is free from synthetic inputs, pollutants, and excessive antibiotic use. 
  • Fair:
    • Solidarity economies are better for people and the planet. When food systems ensure fair pay and fair working conditions, we balance global economies.
    • Farmers, fish harvesters, food producers, Indigenous people, and all workers are valued as key experts and decision-makers.

This Core Vision statement will be kept updated with Slow Food International’s official statements.

ORGANIZATIONAL ENTITIES

ARTICLE 1. THE CHAPTER AND CHAPTER LEADERS

Slow Food is a global network of local groups. In the United States, chapters are the primary way that people come together for good, clean and fair food for all in their neighborhoods. 

Legal status: Slow Food USA is registered as a 501(c)3 nonprofit with a group exemption, allowing chapters to form under the SFUSA umbrella and get started right away on local action, without having to create an entirely separate nonprofit organization. Chapters obtain an EIN in their state, then SFUSA adds that EIN and chapter to its national group tax exemption. This gives chapters the ability to raise and distribute funds as a nonprofit. Slow Food chapters at universities generally register as campus clubs and don’t need a separate EIN. 

What chapters do: United under the global Slow Food vision, chapter leaders rally community members to craft a mission that responds to the local food system. Chapters focus on three pillars of work: 1) nourishing cultural and biological diversity, 2) inspiring, mobilizing and educating people, and 3) advocating for policies that transform food systems. Chapters also serve as a local anchor and organizer for regional, national and global Slow Food initiatives and networks.

ARTICLE 1 A. Chapter Formation

To establish a Chapter:

  • Organize a founding team who will be the founding board of the new chapter. We recommend 5 people, and require a minimum of 3 (two of whom must be a (1) Secretary and (2) Treasurer)
  • Complete the Slow Food USA Chapter Application, found on Slow Food USA website, including the Slow Food Code of Conduct. The National Office will approve the applications.
  • Complete the organizational tasks and documents to establish a chapter with support from the National Office, including approving bylaws, acquiring state EIN, establishing a chapter bank account, and more. 
  • Connect with at least one sister chapter and at least one Regional Councilor that exhibits strengths in the same thematic areas of interest or the same geographic region.
  • Celebrate!

ARTICLE 1 B. Chapter Benefits

When you become a Slow Food chapter, you join a global family of people dedicated to good, clean and fair food for all. These are some of the specific benefits:

  • Connect to local, national and international Slow Food entities (chapters, regional councilors, national office, international communities). 
  • Access chapter toolkits to get you started on bylaws, board governance, projects and campaigns. 
  • Ability to raise and distribute charitable funds as a nonprofit entity.
  • Ability to host Slow Food events and to coordinate programs. 
  • A Slow Food logo for your chapter, provided by the National Office (see Slow Food International Brand Book for guidelines and rules).
  • Gain a policy platform for advocating for good, clean and fair food. 
  • Be listed on the Slow Food USA website, along with other chapters and community action teams.
  • Ability to participate in regional, national and international governing bodies, including regional councilors and international councilors.
  • Ability to nominate a delegate(s) to attend the National Congress and Terra Madre, and vote on relevant business.

ARTICLE 1 C. Chapter Responsibilities

Baseline governance responsibilities

  • Maintain a healthy and functional Chapter Board. At minimum this is 3 board members, which must include a Secretary and Treasurer. 
  • Meet at least 4 times a year (in person or virtual) with the Chapter Board to manage chapter governance. This includes adherence to chapter bylaws, chapter leadership elections as needed, support of chapter leaders, support of chapter activities, and finance tasks.

Baseline finance responsibilities

  • Maintain a chapter bank account in alignment with bylaws and 501(c)3 non-profit laws.
  • File an annual 990 report to the IRS.
  • Manage a membership program through Slow Food USA. On the SFUSA website, individual and business members select their local chapter affiliations, and SFUSA shares those contacts with chapter leaders. Membership funds support local chapters, Slow Food USA and Slow Food International.

Baseline management responsibilities

  • Submit an Annual Report to the National Office by the stated deadline, reporting on the past year and presenting an action plan for the coming year.
  • Be the hub of Slow Food values in your community in your relationships and actions, centering equity, inclusion and justice in all things.
  • Maintain healthy and transparent relationships with local community partners, community members, other Slow Food groups, and Slow Food members. 

ARTICLE 1 D. Chapter Conflict and Dissolution

Healthy chapters spring from healthy governance practices and value-aligned boards. But we recognize that boards can face tricky internal disagreements, volunteer burnout or conflicts that are not easily resolved. The conflict resolution process depends on the root of the issue.

Individual conflict

When board members join a chapter, they must sign onto the Slow Food Code of Conduct. If individuals do not abide by this code, chapter leaders should begin a process to mediate the conflict internally. Mediation and conversations should start at the chapter level. If the issue cannot be resolved by the board and the tools in the chapter bylaws, a Slow Food Regional Councilor will serve as a third-party and neutral mediator, and the national office should be notified.

If the conflict is still not resolved through group dialogue, then national staff will step in to mediate. National staff will work to gain a full understanding of all sides of the conflict.

SFUSA staff have authority to 1) administer a vote for the board member’s position, with voting by all current members of the chapter, or 2) dismiss the individual as a leader in Slow Food.  

The severity and speed of individual conflict resolution depends on the severity of the conflict. For example, we have zero tolerance of sexual harassment or bullying, and the individual will immediately be removed from his/her/their leadership role. Individuals may appeal decisions to the SFUSA board of directors, who have the final authority in the conflict.

Chapter Standby and Dissolution Process
A chapter may choose to go on standby when boards are too small to sustain themselves. The benefit of going on standby is that a revived Chapter Board or a new Chapter Board can more easily restart chapter functionality. So, a standby chapter is a great option if there is a reasonable possibility for chapter function to return within a year. 

Process:

  • Notify Slow Food USA of the need to put the chapter on standby.
  • Change passwords to all social media, website hosting and domain registration, email newsletters, and other platforms, so that these official Slow Food chapter platforms are not used for personal use. Share all relevant passwords and account info with Slow Food USA.
  • Close the chapter bank account and send funds to Slow Food USA. These funds will be restricted for any revival of the chapter, for one calendar year from the standby date.

Once a chapter is in standby for over a year, the national office will proceed to officially close the chapter. 

Chapter Revocation Process
If a chapter, as a whole, is in violation of the Code of Conduct, its chapter bylaws, this National Statute and other governing documents, or pursues action inconsistent with the mission of Slow Food, then the national office has authority to revoke its Chapter’s Charter, resulting in immediate dissolution of the chapter and revocation of the benefits and responsibilities outlined in Article 2. 

ARTICLE 2. COMMUNITY ACTION TEAMS

ARTICLE 2. COMMUNITY ACTION TEAM

Community Action Teams are a group of people focused on a common goal, idea, interest or specific aspect of the food system aligned with Slow Food values. This model gives a group of people the ability to 1) align with values of Slow Food, 2) gain a structure for organizing people, 3) connect with Slow Food movement leaders. The scope of Action Teams can be local, regional, national or international. 

Legal status: Community Action Teams are informal groups and do not register an EIN or have separate governing boards with bylaws. If they want to handle funds, they must either convert to be a chapter, or partner with a local chapter or the National Office as their fiscal agent.

What community action teams do: United under the global Slow Food vision, Community Action Teams focus on three pillars of work: 1) nourishing cultural and biological diversity, 2) inspiring, mobilizing and educating people, and 3) advocating for policies that transform food systems.

ARTICLE 2 A. Community Action Team Formation

To establish a Community Action Team

  • Organize a founding team. We recommend 5 people, and require a minimum of 3.
  • Complete the Slow Food USA Community Action Team form, found on the SFUSA website, including the Slow Food Code of Conduct. The National Office will evaluate applications and reach out to relevant regional councilors to make introductions and start building relationships. 
  • Once approved, complete the initial action plan template and leader directory. 
  • Complete Slow Food USA orientation and connect with at least one Regional Councilor.
  • Celebrate!

ARTICLE 2 B. Community Action Team Benefits

  • Connect to local, national and international Slow Food entities (chapters, regional councilors, national office, international communities).
  • Access toolkits to help you create an organizational structure.
  • Ability to partner with the National Office, or local/state chapter as your fiscal sponsor, with an admin fee to stay with the legal entity.
  • Ability to host Slow Food events and to coordinate programs. 
  • A Slow Food logo provided by the National Office (see Slow Food International Brand Book for guidelines and rules).
  • Gain a policy platform for advocating for good, clean and fair food. 
  • Be listed on the Slow Food USA website, along with chapters and other community action teams.
  • Ability to participate in regional, national and international governing bodies, including regional councilors and international councilors.
  • Ability to nominate a delegate(s) to attend the National Congress and Terra Madre, and vote on relevant business.

ARTICLE 2 C. Community Action Team Responsibilities

  • Submit an Annual Report to the National Office by the stated deadline, reporting on the past year and presenting an action plan for the coming year.
  • Maintain a minimum of 3 participants.
  • Maintain a roster of participants with up to date contact information.
  • Align with the National Statute, values of Slow Food, and Code of Conduct, centering equity, inclusion and justice in all things.
  • Maintain healthy and transparent relationships with local community partners, community members, other Slow Food groups, and Slow Food members. 

ARTICLE 2 D. Community Action Team Conflict and Dissolution

Healthy community action teams spring from healthy communication and value-aligned participants. But we recognize that collaboration is complicated. The conflict resolution process depends on the root of the issue.

Individual conflict
When participants join a community action team, they must sign onto the Slow Food Code of Conduct. If individuals do not abide by this code, fellow teammates should begin a process to mediate the conflict internally. If the issue cannot be resolved by conversations and mediation within the team using Code of Conduct and Slow Food values, a Slow Food Regional Councilor will serve as a third-party and neutral mediator, and the national office should be notified.

If the conflict is still not resolved through this group dialogue, then national staff will step in to mediate. National staff will work to gain a full understanding of all sides of the conflict. SFUSA staff have authority to immediately dismiss the individual as a leader in Slow Food.  

The severity and speed of individual conflict resolution depends on the severity of the conflict. For example, we have zero tolerance of sexual harassment or bullying, and the individual will immediately be removed from his/her/their leadership role. Individuals may appeal decisions to the SFUSA board of directors, who have the final authority in the conflict.

Community Action Team Dissolution Process
A Community Action Team can dissolve at any time. The dissolution of the team is not the same as the dissolution of Slow Food’s program. For example, the community action team for Slow Beer may dissolve due to inactivity but the Slow Beer program may remain active nationally and internationally. Hopefully, in the near future a new Community Action Team will form to continue organizing. 

Process:

  • Notify Slow Food USA of the need to dissolve
  • Change passwords to all social media, website hosting and domain registration, email newsletters, and other platforms, so that these official Slow Food chapter platforms are not used for personal use. Share all relevant passwords and account info with Slow Food USA

Community Action Team Revocation Process
If a community action team, as a whole, is in violation of the Code of Conduct, this National Statute, and other governing documents, or pursues action inconsistent with the mission of Slow Food, then the national office has authority to immediate dissolve of the community action team and revocation of the benefits and responsibilities outlined in Article 2.

ARTICLE 3. REGIONAL COUNCILORS

ARTICLE 3. REGIONAL COUNCILORS

The role of Regional Councilors is to steward a healthy network that unites the joy of food with the pursuit of justice. They do this by (1) facilitating connections and communications amongst Slow Food leaders in their region and beyond, (2) aligning values to the global vision of Slow Food, (3) providing strategic, interpersonal and technical mentorship to Slow Food leaders in each region so we work together for good, clean and fair food for all.

ARTICLE 3 A. Regional Councilor Team

Regional Councilors work as a team. There should be no less than three, and no more than 10 councilors in each region. Regional Councilors should reside in the region they council. Each person on a Regional Councilor team works in the entire region; it’s up to each team to divide the work. Each councilor can take on a specific role, depending on their skills and time availability. 

Regional Councilors should have at least three years experience in leadership with Slow Food or with another community-based organization, so they have the experience and skills necessary to be a mentor to Slow Food leaders. At least one member of the Regional Councilor team must have significant Slow Food chapter leadership experience. 

ARTICLE 3 B. Regional Councilor Selection and Term

Any Slow Food leader in the region and/or the National Office may recommend an individual for the regional councilor role. Individuals may also nominate themselves. The region’s existing chapters decide by consensus to accept or reject the recommendation. This consensus process is managed by existing Regional Councilors.

Regional councilors are expected to serve for a minimum of two years and a maximum of four years, and are encouraged to train a Rising Councilor for 6 months – 1 year before their term is complete.

ARTICLE 3 C. Responsibilities of a Regional Councilor

Regional Councilor responsibilities:  

  • Coordinate communications amongst chapters, so that chapters are aware of neighboring chapters, have a sense of regional community, and have a baseline for possible collaboration and inspiration.
  • Mentor chapter board leaders in basic chapter functions such as bookkeeping, fundraising, event planning, leader support, governance, community partnerships, and EIJ (equity, inclusion and justice), so that chapters are well-functioning organizations that sustain thriving community initiatives and partnerships.
  • Keep chapters connected to Slow Food USA and Slow Food International, so that chapters align with the broader Slow Food movement, connect with the many available resources, and so national and international understand and celebrate the local work. Send a regional representative to SFUSA’s monthly Roundtable calls. 
  • Mediate conflicts, so that we maintain healthy and diverse community relationships and initiatives, and uphold an equitable and thriving chapter leadership culture.
  • Sustain the regional councilor team, so that chapters have consistent high quality support and that existing regional councilor teammates do not shoulder an unfair burden of labor.

ARTICLE 3 D. Removal of a Regional Councilor

When Regional Councilors join the team, they must sign onto the Slow Food Code of Conduct. If individuals do not abide by this code, then the regional councilor team should begin a process to mediate the conflict internally. Mediation and conversations should start at the regional team level. If the issue cannot be resolved, the national office should be asked to help. If chapter leaders in a region wish to remove one of their Regional Councilors, they should 1) discuss the issue with other councilors in the region; 2) as needed, request help from the National Office. 

National staff will work to gain a full understanding of all sides of the conflict.

National staff have authority to 1) ask the individual to take a break in leadership, 2) immediately dismiss the individual as a regional councilor in Slow Food. 

The severity and speed of individual conflict resolution depends on the severity of the conflict. For example, we have zero tolerance of sexual harassment or bullying, and the individual will immediately be removed from his/her/their leadership role. Individuals may appeal decisions to the SFUSA board of directors, who have the final authority in the conflict.

ARTICLE 4. NATIONAL OFFICE

ARTICLE 4. NATIONAL OFFICE

The purpose of the National Office is to (1) cultivate nationwide programs, the network of local chapters, and all official entities listed in this National Statute; (2) host educational events and advocacy campaigns that grow our collective impact; (3) build solidarity through partnerships; (4) provide leadership and a national voice; and (5) serve as a national anchor and organizer for the global Slow Food movement.

The National Office consists of the staff, including all employees, interns, contractors, consultants, and designated volunteers working under the direction of the Executive Director.

ARTICLE 4 A. National Office Responsibilities

Baseline governance responsibilities

  • Approve new Chapter and Community Action Team applications; oversee compliance with National Statute requirements; oversee selection of Regional Councilors.
  • Nurture network leadership with a focus on equity, inclusion and justice at all levels; maintain an open, equitable and transparent culture that allows diversity to thrive.

Baseline finance responsibilities

  • Maintain a bank account in alignment with bylaws and 501(c)3 non-profit laws.
  • File an annual 990 report and chapter EIN list to the IRS, and maintain state registrations.
  • Manage a membership database for all chapters and community action teams; share membership details to each entity. 
  • Ensure that Slow Food USA’s resources are directed towards implementation of the mission of Slow Food in the nation, in accordance with SFUSA’s Guiding Principles.
  • Adhere to all applicable federal, state and local laws, including IRS nonprofit regulations for tax filing and public reporting.

Baseline management responsibilities

  • Oversee conflict mediation with Chapter leadership, Community Action Team leadership, or Regional Councilors when a complaint has been lodged. Resolve disputes at the Chapter level, should the Regional Councilors be unable to act with impartiality.
  • Facilitate the flow of information and feedback between the local, state, national, and international entities of the organization.
  • Implement national campaigns, projects, and initiatives.
  • Carry out all operational activities necessary for the functioning and health of the organization.
  • Adhere to regulations in the National Statute, International Statute, Code of Use for Slow Food Logos, and Slow Food Fundraising Guidelines. 
ARTICLE 5. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

ARTICLE 5. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

The Executive Director leads and manages the SFUSA organization in the United States according to the bylaws of the 501(c)3.

ARTICLE 5 A. Executive Director Responsibilities

Responsibilities of the Executive Director are specified in the Executive Director Job Description approved by the SFUSA National Board. They include, but are not limited to:

  • Give direction and leadership toward the achievement of SFUSA’s philosophy, mission, strategy, and its annual goals and objectives.
  • Be a voice of SFUSA in public, including the broader Slow Food network and media. 
  • Propose and manage the annual budget.
  • Hire and terminate staff.
  • Manage staff and other resources.
  • Represent SFUSA on the Slow Food International Board or delegate a representative, subject to approval of the National Board, to do so in his/her/their stead.
  • Abide by the policies and priorities set by the National Board.
  • Report to the National Board per its request and attend National Board meetings.
ARTICLE 6. NATIONAL BOARD OF DIRECTORS

ARTICLE 6. NATIONAL BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Slow Food International recognizes the Slow Food USA National Board of Directors, via the Slow Food USA – Slow Food International Agreement, as the “National Board of Directors” as stated in Article 17 of the International Statute. The SFUSA-SFI Agreement, signed by the International President (or his/her/their delegate) and the Chair of the National Board, gives the SFUSA Board of Directors exclusive concession to use the Slow Food national logo, in the format governed by the Code of Use for Slow Food Logos. The National Board operates in accordance with the Slow Food USA Bylaws and Articles of Incorporation. These include, but are not limited to the following principles:

ARTICLE 6 A. National Board Formation 

The National Board shall consist of a minimum of three members. One member shall be the International President (or his/her/their delegate). One member shall be a former Regional Councilor, elected by the Board upon nomination by the body of the Regional Councilors as a whole. One third of the USA-based members shall be elected by the Board from the SFUSA Volunteer Leadership. When vacancies arise, the National Board shall ensure compliance with these composition requirements within six months. 

The National Board, in response to the needs of the organization, may define criteria for the remaining seats. The National Board may then fill these seats at its discretion. The timing of elections, number of members and their terms are set by the National Board in reference to the need to stagger terms.

ARTICLE 6 B. National Board Responsibilities

Baseline governance responsibilities

  • Amend all governing documents of Slow Food USA, including the National Statute, which is subject to ratification by delegates at the National Congress.
  • Set policies and priorities in accordance with and fulfillment of the SFUSA Guiding Principles, National Statute, International Statute, Code of Use for Slow Food Logos, and Slow Food Fundraising Guidelines.
  • Elect corporate officers in accordance with state and federal laws pertaining to corporate governance.
  • Provide a National Board representative to the Regional Councilors as the primary point of contact for ensuring communication between the Regional Councilors and the Board.
  • Meet periodically online or in person (minimum 4 times per year).

Baseline finance responsibilities

  • Approve the annual budget and review the financial statements on a quarterly basis.
  • Assist the National Office in fundraising efforts, including a personally significant annual financial contribution to Slow Food USA.

Baseline management responsibilities

  • With the SFUSA National Office and Executive Director, clearly articulate and maintain the organization’s mission, accomplishments, and goals to the network and to the broader public; and garner support from the community in order to advance SFUSA’s mission.
  • Ensure that the organization complies with all applicable federal and state laws.
  • Hire, terminate, and conduct annual performance reviews of the Executive Director.

ARTICLE 6 C. International Representation

The National Board nominates a slate to fill seats representing Slow Food USA on the International Board or International Council (to be confirmed by election at the International Congress). 

ARTICLE 6 D. National Board Conflict

When board members join Slow Food USA, they must sign onto the Slow Food Code of Conduct. If individuals do not abide by this code or are in clear conflict with the principles and aims of Slow Food, the National Office and other Directors will work with the Board Director in question to provide feedback on conflicts and set a reasonable timeline to reconcile issues before suggesting recourse for removal. If the issue continues, a simple majority of National Board Directors may remove a Board Director.

ARTICLE 7. NATIONAL CONGRESS

ARTICLE 7. NATIONAL CONGRESS 

A National Congress shall be held at least every four years, in conjunction with or separately from a larger annual gathering of the Slow Food network. The purpose of this Congress is to conduct business, provide the opportunity for peer-to-peer learning among Leaders, and promote national/regional networking activities.

ARTICLE 7 A. National Congress Formation

Before each National Congress, in order to determine the number and distribution of voting-delegate spots, the National Office decides on a system of active-Leaders representation. At least one representative from each active entity shall be designated a voting delegate.

ARTICLE 7 B. National Congress Responsibilities

  • Ratify any amendments to the National Statute made by the Board or the network in the period preceding the Congress.
  • Deliberate policies, programs, and future direction of Slow Food USA.
ARTICLE 8. INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL REPRESENTATION

ARTICLE 8. INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL REPRESENTATION

Delegates to the International Council represent Slow Food USA in the international arena.

ARTICLE 8 A. International Councilor Formation

The Slow Food International Council will provide guidelines that stipulate the number of Councilor seats that represent Slow Food USA on the Council. Nominees are selected by the National Office and Regional Councilors, and must be confirmed at the International Congress. The length of each International Councilor’s service extends until the next International Congress.

ARTICLE 8 B. International Councilor Responsibilities

  • Cast a vote on issues presented to the International Council.
  • Attend meetings of the International Council.
  • Represent the members of Slow Food USA.
  • Communicate to the Board, Regional Councilors and Leaders the policies and programs approved by the International Council.

Photo by Tim Mossholder via Unsplash